Filing for an extension isn’t without perils

 

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Yes, the federal income tax filing deadline is slightly later than usual this year — April 18 — but it’s now nearly upon us. So, if you haven’t filed your return yet, you may be thinking about an extension.

 
Extension deadlines
Filing for an extension allows you to delay filing your return until the applicable extension deadline:
• Individuals — October 17, 2016
• Trusts and estates — September 15, 2016

 
The perils
While filing for an extension can provide relief from April 18 deadline stress, it’s important to consider the perils:
• If you expect to owe tax, keep in mind that, to avoid potential interest and penalties, you still must (with a few exceptions) pay any tax due by April 18.
• If you expect a refund, remember that you’re simply extending the amount of time your money is in the government’s pockets rather than your own.

 
A tax-smart move?
Filing for an extension can still be tax-smart if you’re missing critical documents or you face unexpected life events that prevent you from devoting sufficient time to your return right now. Please contact us if you need help or have questions about avoiding interest and penalties.

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Are you missing a refund?

 

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Did you forget to file your 2012 federal income tax return? You’re not alone. The IRS says an estimated one million taxpayers did not file a return for that year, leaving refunds totaling $950 million unclaimed. If you’re one of those taxpayers, you must file a 2012 federal income tax return no later than this year’s April tax deadline.

 
There is no penalty for failure to file if you are due a refund. Contact us for an appointment today.

April is a busy month for taxes- don’t miss the deadlines!

 

Is yoshops-1026415_960_720ur tax return finished? If not, this year you have an extra day – or two – to file. April 18, 2016, is the due date to file your 2015 individual federal income tax return and pay any balance due. If you live in Maine or Massachusetts, you have until Tuesday, April 19, to file and pay.

 
Here’s why. The normal due date – Friday, April 15 – is Emancipation Day. That’s a holiday in the District of Columbia, so the tax filing deadline shifts to Monday, April 18. However, Monday, April 18, is also a holiday (Patriots Day) in Maine and Massachusetts. That means if you live in either of those states, your deadline moves to April 19. The extended due dates apply whether you file electronically or on paper.

 
Here are other major mid-April deadlines.
● The above due dates also apply to filing an automatic extension for your 2015 individual income tax return if you can’t file by the deadline. You don’t need to explain to the IRS why you need more time and the automatic extension gives you until October 17, 2016, to file your return. An extension does not, generally, give you more time to pay taxes you still owe. To avoid penalty and interest charges, taxes must be paid by the April deadline.
● Filing 2015 partnership returns for calendar year partnerships.
● Filing 2015 income tax returns for calendar year trusts and estates.
● Filing 2015 annual gift tax returns.
● Making 2015 IRA contributions.
● Paying the first quarterly installment of 2016 individual estimated tax.
● Amending 2012 individual tax returns (unless the 2012 return had a filing extension).
● Original filing of a 2012 individual income tax return to claim a refund of taxes. If you have tax refunds due for prior years, the refund is lost unless you file a return to claim it.

Did you enroll in HealthCare.gov? You may be eligible for a federal tax credit

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If you or a family member enrolled in a qualified health plan offered through a government insurance marketplace, such as HealthCare.gov, you may be eligible for a federal tax credit. The amount of the credit varies depending on your household income and can be claimed on your tax return. Alternatively, you have the option to receive all or part of the credit in advance in the form of payments to your insurer that reduce your health insurance premiums.

 
Either way, you need to file a federal income tax return. That’s the case even if you’re usually not required to file. In the case of advance payments, failing to file your tax return can prevent you from receiving the credit in future years.
To make sure you received the correct amount of the credit, or to claim it, attach Form 8962, Premium Tax Credit, to your return.

 
For questions or filing assistance, please contact our office..