Create a road map to retirement

above-736879__180Preparing for your retirement is a journey. And like most journeys, success or failure often hinges on decisions made early in the trip. Consider some of these pointers as you develop your personal road map to retirement.

A solid retirement plan begins with an honest assessment of what your golden years will look like. Will they involve exotic travel, special purchases, or carefree living? Or do you plan to live modestly, perhaps working part time? A possible hint might be to consider how you are living right now. Many people assume that their living costs will decline later in life, but they often stay about the same or even increase.

Once you know how you want to live, it’s time to take stock of your assets. Are your investments where they should be, or do you have some catching up to do? Keep in mind that those 50 years and older can contribute an extra amount each year into their 401(k) or IRA to help get up to speed. And no matter what career stage you are in, be sure to take full advantage of the matching provision in your employer’s plan.

Like any excursion, your path to retirement will need an occasional tweaking to stay on course. As your working years draw to a close, consider shifting your asset allocation from higher risk securities to those with less price volatility and steadier cash flows. And along the way, take steps to keep your household budget in check. Think hard before incurring additional debt that might stymie your retirement plans. Analyze your spending to see what you really need to live on.

Finally, assemble a team of professionals to help chart your path. You might need to coordinate life and health insurance, estate plans, and tax issues to achieve your retirement goals. If you need assistance, give our office a call.

If your business is owned by two or more persons, this is one of the most important legal documents your business should have

hand-376213__180Marriages end, and so do business ventures. If your business is owned by two or more persons, a buy-sell agreement is one of the most important legal documents your business can have. This document provides for the “buyout” of an owner’s interest when that owner leaves. Here are the areas that a buy-sell agreement should typically address.

  • Describe the events that will trigger the agreement, such as a divorce, disability, death, or notice that an owner simply wants to leave.
  • Set a value for each owner’s interest, or provide a formula to value each interest at a later date. Your agreement might require an independent business appraisal.
  • Without a method to set the value, there could be some serious problems. Let’s say you and your partner reach a point where you can no longer work together. You believe the company is worth $2 million. Your partner refuses to sell, but he makes you a $100,000, take-it or leave-it offer for your 50% interest. You could face a drawn-out legal battle to settle things.
  • Outline a funding plan. Different purchase and financing plans can be used to cover different situations. For example, cross-purchase agreements allow the remaining owners to buy an exiting owner’s share. A redemption agreement allows the company to buy back an exiting owner’s share. Financing options might include owner financing (an installment contract) or life insurance, in the case of an owner’s death.
  • Prevent unwanted transfers. Generally owners don’t want a business associate they didn’t choose. Yet this could happen if one owner divorces, dies, or sells his shares to an outsider.

A buy-sell agreement is designed to provide fair compensation to an exiting owner, while making it possible for the remaining partners to continue in business. We can work with you and your attorney to develop a buy-sell agreement or to review your existing agreement. Call us.